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    The food poisoning outbreak linked to romaine lettuce has spread to three more states.

    Health officials on Friday said they now have reports of 98 cases in 22 states, with the addition of Mississippi, Tennessee and Wisconsin. The outbreak is blamed on E. coli bacteria in romaine lettuce grown in Yuma, Arizona.

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says the bacteria strain behind the outbreak tends to cause more serious illnesses. Forty-six people have been hospitalized, including 10 with kidney failure. The most recent illness began a week ago. No deaths are reported.

    Health officials say people shouldn't eat romaine lettuce unless they know it's not from Yuma. Every winter, the Yuma region provides most of the romaine sold in the U.S.

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    Elaine K. Howley | April 25, 2018

    And why are these states still smoking hotspots?

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    Although quite different from one another, humans, plants and some fungi share gravitropism, the ability to know up from down. It helps us survive. By sensing Earth’s gravitational pull, humans can move around without getting dizzy and plants and fungi know how to grow to obtain nutrients and reproduce.

    Continue reading the main story
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    Barbara Bush's death in my home state of Texas brought tears to my eyes, but her decision to opt for comfort care at the end of life is a great educational moment for us all. Although her family did not specify the cause of death of our former first lady, we know she suffered from congestive heart failure and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), as my mother did. My father, a non-smoker, suffered from emphysema, congestive heart failure and diabetes.

    Throughout their lives, my parents made three words clear: "If we become too ill and there is no longer a cure for us: Do not resuscitate."

    Little did we know years later both would develop pulmonary diseases that would require tubes forced down their throats to feed air into their fluid-filled lungs.

    More than six years have passed since the death of my parents, Victor and Socorro González, in my hometown in Brownsville. After a series of repeated hospitalizations, as my parents health care proxies, my siblings and I declined further medical treatment for them. Instead, we opted for comfort care, just as Bush did, that should have allowed doctors to minimize mom's and dad's suffering, so they could die as comfortably and peacefully as possible. Unfortunately, that is not what happened in my dad's case.

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    Leigh Cowart
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